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"With all the wacky stuff that urbexers come up with, this forum could be chock full of hilarity" -iFUBAR 12/14/2010
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Fuzz_Face
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Sun Apr 24, 2011 3:08 pm

And with strange aeons even death may die.

This place needs a Lovecraft thread. Favorite stories anyone? I love "The Colour out of Space," which was apparently his personal favorite, too.
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thepinkbyrd
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Sun Apr 24, 2011 5:47 pm

OOooooo!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I love my elder gods!!!!!!! Also two of my favorite stories are "Dreams in the Witch House" and "At the Mountains of Madness".
We need to get coffee and talk Lovecraft.
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Esoteric
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Sun Apr 24, 2011 8:50 pm

I'm a fan. My favorite is The Case of Charles Dexter Ward.

In March I sold my Lovecraft Tarot deck on Amazon.com for $350 - bought it new for $40 eight years ago! It was a really cool collectable for the artwork.
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Fuzz_Face
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Wed Apr 27, 2011 9:40 pm

[quote="thepinkbyrd"]OOooooo!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I love my elder gods!!!!!!! Also two of my favorite stories are "Dreams in the Witch House" and "At the Mountains of Madness".
We need to get coffee and talk Lovecraft.[/quote]

Indeed! Have you guys heard about the Mountains of Madness movie? I think it looks promising.
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thepinkbyrd
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Wed Apr 27, 2011 11:04 pm

It's ok, kinda cheesey.
Cthuluh does make an appearance though.
Check it out.
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Nobo
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Sun May 15, 2011 4:15 pm

I love the Man from Rhode Island. I remember it was so hard to get into his style at first, but after I did it was just...creepy in a weird way.
My favorite is definitely "The Shadow Over Innsmouth". The H.P. Lovecraft Historical Society did a wicked faux-old-time radio adaptation that I really like. You can get it and a bunch of others off their website (it's called Dark Adventure Radio Theatre).
I'm still kind bummed Del Toro stopped the ATMOM movie (the execs wouldn't invest in R rated).
"Tell the truth, but lead so improbable a life that the truth will never be believed." -Aleister Crowley

Aliases: Caligari, Crucified Nun, Mad Bomber, Jimmy Quinn, Slappy Tello
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Nobo
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Sun Dec 02, 2012 5:13 pm

Just wanted to give the other resident Lovecraft fans a little heads-up.
The H.P. Lovecraft Historical Society just came out with a new adaptation for their faux old time radio series, Dark Adventure Radio Theater, and (awww yeeeah) it's The Call of Cthulhu!!!

If you haven't exposed yourself to the brilliance of DART, I heartily recommend you give it a try. The series features sweeping scores, incredible actors, sound effects, the whole shebang. They totally blow those crappy Atlanta Radio Theater Company adaptations out of the water, and they never sacrifice the original plot to do it. If you're someone who wants to love Lovecraft, but can't get past the prose, do yourself a favor and start collecting every episode. You can also sleep a little sounder knowing that you helped support the people who made the great 1920's-style film adaptation of The Call of Cthulhu.

Buy it here as an mp3 download. If you've got a little extra cheddar, I suggest you snatch up the prop-stuffed jewel case.
"Tell the truth, but lead so improbable a life that the truth will never be believed." -Aleister Crowley

Aliases: Caligari, Crucified Nun, Mad Bomber, Jimmy Quinn, Slappy Tello
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thepinkbyrd
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Sun Dec 02, 2012 8:37 pm

Noppera-Boo wrote:Just wanted to give the other resident Lovecraft fans a little heads-up.
The H.P. Lovecraft Historical Society just came out with a new adaptation for their faux old time radio series, Dark Adventure Radio Theater, and (awww yeeeah) it's The Call of Cthulhu!!!

If you haven't exposed yourself to the brilliance of DART, I heartily recommend you give it a try. The series features sweeping scores, incredible actors, sound effects, the whole shebang. They totally blow those crappy Atlanta Radio Theater Company adaptations out of the water, and they never sacrifice the original plot to do it. If you're someone who wants to love Lovecraft, but can't get past the prose, do yourself a favor and start collecting every episode. You can also sleep a little sounder knowing that you helped support the people who made the great 1920's-style film adaptation of The Call of Cthulhu.

Buy it here as an mp3 download. If you've got a little extra cheddar, I suggest you snatch up the prop-stuffed jewel case.


brb.
**DED**
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Esoteric
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Mon Dec 03, 2012 12:34 pm

Noppera-Boo wrote:Just wanted to give the other resident Lovecraft fans a little heads-up.
The H.P. Lovecraft Historical Society just came out with a new adaptation for their faux old time radio series, Dark Adventure Radio Theater, and (awww yeeeah) it's The Call of Cthulhu!!!



Thanks for sharing this, I'm going to get the jewel case
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Esoteric
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Tue Dec 04, 2012 2:30 pm

I just wanted to plug some books Lovecraft fans might enjoy:

These are all written by others, inspired by HPL

Cold Print by Ramsey Campbell - a collection of short stories not to be missed, he is a great writer and these range from straight horror to the esoteric and weird. One of my favorite collections and I still have the old beat up paperback I found years ago.

The Horror in the Museum and Other Revisions - a collection of stories said to be "edited and corrected" by HPL but were mostly ghostwritten by him. It's a mix, some weak but 'The Mound' makes it worth getting.

Tales of the Lovecraft Mythos edited by Robert Price - a collection of mythos stories written by the Lovecraft circle and others. Early stuff to more recent. If you have other collections you'll see overlap.

The Book of Iod by Henry Kuttner - he's most known for his story Mimsey Were the Borogoves which was made into a movie, The Last Mimsey. But he wrote early mythos stories and I really like them. The Book of Iod collects most of them. http://www.amazon.com/The-Book-Iod-Mythos-Cthulhu/dp/1568820453

New Tales of the Cthulhu Mythos edited by Ramsey Campbell (1980) A solid collection, some overlap with other collections

Night Shift by Stephen King, for the mythos related story Jerusalem's Lot. The De Vermis Mysteriis makes an appearance and it's one of my favorite mythos stories. Super creepy.....there are rats behind the walls again....very large, from the sound of them.... Jerusalem's Lot has to the best Lovecraft work not actually written by HPL

Nameless Cults: The Cthulhu Mythos Fiction of Robert E. Howard: These are great! The creator of Conan and Kull wrote a number of mythos stories and this collection is one of the best! Square jaws, jet black manes, swinging swords and the nameless worm. Only a few stories have the typical Howard type character - there's plenty more that are stright horror.

And lastly, drop some bank and get the hardcover 31st Anniversary Edition of the Simon Necronomicon by Ibis Press. This large heavy tome looks great on the shelf and it's fun to read too. Sure it's fake but so what - it's pure entertainment and homage (in my opinion) and it delivers. Plus it has quality cloth binding and acid free paper, and thus will last generations
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Nobo
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Fri Dec 07, 2012 1:18 am

Esoteric wrote:I just wanted to plug some books Lovecraft fans might enjoy:

These are all written by others, inspired by HPL

Awesome list! There goes the rest of my Amazon gift card. :lol:

If you haven't checked out The H.P. Lovecraft Literary Podcast yet, highly recommend it. Mr. Fifer and Mr. Lackey put on a great show complete with music, laughs, and tons of insights. They make many of the less palatable HPL stories jump off the page. The podcast is actually how I first heard of Robert Price (he was a guest on their coverage of The Dunwich Horror). They're done going through all of his stories, but it's still required listening since they're now moving on to things that influenced him. You can get it from iTunes or through their website.

I would also recommend the following:
-Dark Gods by T.E.D. Klein
Awesome collection of Lovecraftian novellas from one of the most underrated writers in the field. "Children of the Kingdom" perfectly captures the essence of Lovecraft's better stories without tapping into the Mythos, and "Black Man With A Horn" breaks down the safety of the fourth wall between HPL, his nightmares, and the reader.

-Dead Sea by Tim Curran
A freighter enters a dark dimension populated by nasty monstrosities. A contemporary Lovecraftian tale that's heavy on the gore.

-The Conqueror Worms by Brian Keene
On a day like any other, the rain starts. Unfortunately, it never stops. One of my favorite post-apocalyptic novels steers Keene's Labyrinth Mythos further into Lovecraft territory. It's the first Keene novel I recommend to people, and if you snag a copy, consider buying his Western creature feature novella, An Occurrence in Crazy Bear Valley (also comes with a great short story that's like a badass sequel to The Valley of Gwangi), while you're at it.

-Keeping Watch by Nate Kenyon
Creepy short story about a childhood tragedy and a sinister thing at the bottom of a lake. I read this one in the awesome giant monster anthology, Monstrous.

-N. by Stephen King
King takes the connection between psychosis and the Mythos into the modern age in this paranoid novella.

-The Great God Pan by Arthur Machen
A classic piece of horror literature that directly influenced The Dunwich Horror.

-The House on the Borderland by William Hope Hodgson
Two hikers come across the diary of a recluse in the ruins of a house. One of my favorite early twentieth century horror novels, its chilling blend of weird horror and science fiction heavily influenced HPL.

In terms of Lovecraft's revisions, I gotta go with "Out of the Aeons" and "The Horror At Martin's Beach". The former is a criminally underrated tale that brings in tons of elements from his earlier stories, and the latter is a creepy monster story that he wrote with Sonia Greene before they were married. We'll have to agree to disagree on The Mound. :mrgreen:

And I always preferred Leiber's Fafhrd and The Grey Mouser over Conan, but I think I may have to crack the spine on my collection of Howard's horror stories after your recommendation. I'm interested in seeing how his concise, action-packed prose blends with the Mythos. I'll give Kuttner a look, too.
"Tell the truth, but lead so improbable a life that the truth will never be believed." -Aleister Crowley

Aliases: Caligari, Crucified Nun, Mad Bomber, Jimmy Quinn, Slappy Tello
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Esoteric
Silver Fox
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Fri Dec 07, 2012 4:25 pm

Here are some collectables/fun toys:

Cthulhu playing cards http://www.prweb.com/releases/cthulhu-playing-cards/call-of-cthulhu/prweb9966444.htm

Cthulhu Fluxx card game: http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/122159/cthulhu-fluxx

And this site lists some HPL related tarot decks: http://www.innsmouthfreepress.com/blog/?p=6799

Watch for HPL collectables and you can make some finds. I bought the Lovecraft tarot in 2002 for $45, and resold it in 2011 for $350 on Amazon!
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Esoteric
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Thu Dec 13, 2012 12:45 pm

This is fanboy geeky but in the Case of Charles Dexter Ward, there's this passage:

Mr. Merritt always confessed to seeing nothing really horrible at the farmhouse, but maintained that the titles of the books in the special library of thaumaturgical, alchemical, and theological subjects which Curwen kept in a front room were alone sufficient to inspire him with a lasting loathing. Perhaps, however, the facial expression of the owner in exhibiting them contributed much of the prejudice. The bizarre collection, besides a host of standard works which Mr. Merritt was not too alarmed to envy, embraced nearly all the cabbalists, daemonologists, and magicians known to man; and was a treasure-house of lore in the doubtful realms of alchemy and astrology. Hermes Trismegistus in Mesnard’s edition, the Turba Philosophorum, Geber’s Liber Investigationis, and Artephius’ Key of Wisdom all were there; with the cabbalistic Zohar, Peter Jammy’s set of Albertus Magnus, Raymond Lully’s Ars Magna et Ultima in Zetzner’s edition, Roger Bacon’s Thesaurus Chemicus, Fludd’s Clavis Alchimiae, and Trithemius’ De Lapide Philosophico crowding them close. Mediaeval Jews and Arabs were represented in profusion, and Mr. Merritt turned pale when, upon taking down a fine volume conspicuously labelled as the Qanoon-e-Islam, he found it was in truth the forbidden Necronomicon of the mad Arab Abdul Alhazred, of which he had heard such monstrous things whispered some years previously after the exposure of nameless rites at the strange little fishing village of Kingsport, in the Province of the Massachusetts-Bay.

So if you collect the various Necronomicons, you can purchase the "Qanoon-e-Islam" which is actually a real late 19th century book on Indian customs. In the story it was a disguised Necronomicon kept in the library of the wizard Joseph Curwen - the real book has nothing to do with HPL or the mythos, HPL just picked up the title from somewhere. But I thought it was kinda cool to have this on the shelf - tho no one else gets the reference :)

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/8120607120/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_9
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Nobo
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Fri Dec 28, 2012 2:14 am

Charles Dexter Ward is absolutely chilling. Lovecraft draws you in with an ominous psychological mystery then delivers a tale of otherworldly threats that can outlive us all.

[Spoilers:]
The scene where Willet delves into the catacombs beneath the bungalow haunted me for a spell after I read it. The failed experiments that get riled up by the flashlight is pure nightmare fuel. Listening to that passage on H.P. Podcraft drove that home.
[/Spoilers]


If you want some eye candy, you should check out propmaker extraordinaire Jason McKittrick's Curwen's Chest.
"Tell the truth, but lead so improbable a life that the truth will never be believed." -Aleister Crowley

Aliases: Caligari, Crucified Nun, Mad Bomber, Jimmy Quinn, Slappy Tello
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Esoteric
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Tue Jan 08, 2013 10:41 am

http://forbiddenplanet.co.uk/blog/2012/the-case-of-charles-dexter-ward/

Amazon says release date is 4/13, got it on the wish list....
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